The Strange World of NSFW Megadrive Games


Part of the goal of this channel has been to listen to all of the music from the Sega Genesis. The good and the bad. The Motoaki and the Yuzo. The Safe For Work and the…Not? Is there such a thing as a Not Safe For Work Genesis game? Well, as it turns out: Yes.

Yes there is. Obviously Sega would never allow such a thing. But unlicensed games happily took the baton. So, for fun, we’re going to take a look at this strange and wonderful world. The story begins in 1991 …probably.

Games made before the mid-90s or so tend to have really nebulous release dates, and this is even worse for unlicensed titles. Still, Divine Sealing is considered one of the earliest unlicensed games for the Genesis, and quite possibly the first unlicensed pornographic game for the Genesis. It’s a somewhat lackluster shmup interspersed with strip scenes of all the characters. The art and music is all original. And made in Japan.

There aren’t individual credits, as far as I know, but the game is made by Studio Fazzy. Or rather, this. …which would be more accurately read as “Studio Fuzzy”. Somewhere along the line, it was misromanized and the name stuck. Sadly, little is known about Studio Fazzy except that it made this game.

There’s a possibility that it made a second game, but the credit is uncertain. That second game is… [Ganso Kyuukyoku Girl 6-nin Adventure Mahjong! Dial Q wo Mawase!] While Divine Sealing is fairly known, information about Dial Q is much more scarce.

This is unfortunate, since the music is considerably better. What is known: the music, art, and story are all original. It was probably released in 1992, and it was made in Japan. Although Studio Fazzy is sometimes credited to the game, the art style is a bit different, And the music driver is completely different. Either way, Divine Sealing and Dial Q are the only two pornographic games for the Mega Drive that were made in Japan.

For the rest of these games, you need to turn to Taiwan. This is the first Taiwanese company we’re looking at because it’s the one with the least information available. According to their website, Creaton Softech was founded in 1994 and focused on software development until 2005, when it shifted to hardware manufacturing. Now it just produces LEDs and LED accessories.

Most importantly, it was a game developer in its earliest years. Five games are known to exist, four of which for the Mega Drive. Of these, only one is pornographic.

Ma Jiang Qing Ren – Ji Ma Jiang Zhi The art appears to be original and is some of the better drawn art to come from Taiwan. The music is also original, and it’s…passable! Not the strongest showing, but nothing to make your ears bleed either.

That said, all of the sound effects are PCM, which is fine except the quality is mud. But I’ve saved the best(-known) for last. Gamtec. These guys were prolific. They also acted very legitimate in every way, except the part where they didn’t have any licenses. The individual members of each development team are often credited.

The company started out by making clones of popular games. For example: Bomboy. This is, rather obviously, a clone of Bomberman.

Over time, the company expanded into more adventurous and original ideas. A particularly interesting example was Legend of Wukong: a retelling of Journey to the West but with time travel. This was eventually released in America in 2008 thanks to some fans who patched and translated the 1996 version. But technically this might still qualify as unlicensed since it was released long after Sega discontinued the Mega Drive Hmm…

But, of course, there were a few pornographic titles in this vast gamography as well. We’ll be looking at three of these. So, in order of how good the music is, we’re immediately tied [Jiuji Majiang II – Lengyan Pian] has a pretty solid tune for the menu music. Once you get past the menu, though, the in-game music is kinda…meh? Super simple instrumentation and lazy (as in lazy Sunday) arrangement.

Graphically, I’m assuming the assets are stolen because it uses digitized photographs, and not very good ones, at that. On the other half of this tie is [16 Zhang Ma Jiang] …which has very similar music, down to the simple instrumentation and that very distinct FM snare. But I find it to be marginally better. Particularly the in-game tune.

The art, however, is significantly better. Hand-drawn and dithered! Look at this style!

Finally, 777 Casino has the best music of these three, hands-down. Except for the intro. It doesn’t reach the quality of Dial Q from earlier, but it’s super charming in its simplicity. Graphically, though, it manages to be the worst.

It barely makes this list, in fact, since the only nudity in the game comes from a single poorly digitized image. The rest of the game has a nice cartoony style, though, so it’s hard to knock, even if it’s incredibly eager to crash and turn into a garbled mess. Before we close out, though, I’d like to bring your attention to something.

These three games share extremely similar FM patches. Most notably, the snare is pretty much identical. While none of these games have credits (that I could find), Legend of Wukong does include credits for a composer: Yamin Xu. Since the patches match across these four games, I’d guess he composed all of them.

And that’s all I have for today. As a fun note, all of the background music in this video came from the games we just discussed. If you like video game music, especially when mixed into seamless 10 minute videos organized by theme, please subscribe to this channel.

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